NOW IN OUR LIBRARY ~ THE LANCASTER

NOW IN OUR LIBRARY ~ THE LANCASTER

Did you know that our Museum Library has over 8500 books?  Our collection is used by our visitors, by folks coming into the Museum to do research, by volunteers, and by those of you looking for titles related to topics of interest.  If you’re not able to come into the Museum personally, perhaps your community library would have these titles, or perhaps you might like to purchase them from your favourite bookstore in order to have them in your home library. The titles I’m sharing with you this time are focussed on the Lancaster:   Written by Leo McKinstry, who also wrote Spitfire: Portrait of a Legend, Lancaster: The Second World War’s Greatest Bomber has a close look at the place of the Lancaster in air history.  “The Lancaster and the Spitfire were the RAF’s two weapons of victory in the Second World War.  But without the bomber, Britain would never have been able to take the fight to the German homeland.  Lancaster highlights the scale of the plane’s achievements, including the famous Dambusters attacks, and how it transformed the effectiveness of Bomber Command. With the first-hand accounts from surviving pilots, engineers and ground crews, this is a compelling saga which cements the plane’s special place in our history.”   FM159, The Lucky Lancaster was authored by Dave Birrell.  This is “one of 7377 Avro Lancasters built to wage war against the Nazis…now one of only four taxiable Lancasters in the world.  It has flown widely over the Pacific, the Atlantic, and to the northern-most point in Canada; has been only weeks away from being scrapped; was towed by a truck...
NOW IN OUR LIBRARY ~ THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS ~  A WINDOW ON VISUAL INFORMATION

NOW IN OUR LIBRARY ~ THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS ~ A WINDOW ON VISUAL INFORMATION

THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS ~ A WINDOW ON VISUAL INFORMATION This posting has been written by Geoff, one of our volunteers, who has great love and respect for magazines.  Come in and meet him Thursday mornings! “The beauty of magazines is their versatility. They can convey detailed information on diverse topics and contain varied views and opinions, facts and figures, and illustrations at a reasonable price and from a multitude of vendors. As well, they are readily available for most people in most urban centers. They are also capable of being updated and corrected when necessary. In all probability, the magazine began centuries ago as an organ of information – pamphlets of local interest or handbills of instruction for the residents of rural areas, or simply news items for the “burgers”. Communication of information continues to be an important feature of societies. Newspapers, radio, television, and magazines have been the mainstay of communication for decades and, of course, we now have the ever present internet. There is little doubt that there will follow ever more revolutionary methods of disseminating information, and that people will continue to enjoy ever quicker instruments for accessing that information. But for lots of readers the tactile pleasure of leafing through a periodical cannot be disguised. The Comox Air Force Museum is currently featuring a collection of the Illustrated London News weekly magazines from the First World War era. Each week, the appropriate issue ( 100 years late ) is displayed in the WWI section of the Museum’s main gallery; it is full of the ( then ) current news from the ‘front’, as well as...
ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS, STOCKY … THESE ARE A FEW OF OUR FAVOURITE THINGS …

ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS, STOCKY … THESE ARE A FEW OF OUR FAVOURITE THINGS …

Geoff decided upon the “Illustrated London News”.  He told me he chose this “for the following reasons: It is a fairly pristine collection, albeit not complete. It presents a broad section of life in the early 20th Century, although only the upper section of society. Each week, the appropriate 100 year old magazine is displayed in the Main Gallery. The stories are up to date, for that time, and the future is unknown to them, much as the news we read today is in no way predictive of what the immediate future holds for us.  For me this is a very visceral connection to the people of the First World War.”               Ken enjoys ” a visit from Stocky Edwards and his interaction with the visitors and our volunteers.  He is the best role model you could ever hope for. ”  We have a couple of Stocky’s books in our Museum Library; come in, curl up in “the comfy chair” and have a read of The Desert Hawk or Kittyhawk Pilot.       Norm is certainly a Comox Air Force Museum enthusiast!  ” I have been a volunteer here for about two years.  The Museum is a modern example of a really well displayed showcase.  But what I have found, for me, is the wonderful people behind the scenes.  These terrific, enthusiastic, dedicated, knowledgeable, and friendly people are what makes the Museum what it is.  In my opinion, it’s a fantastic package that makes a visit to our Museum both informative and family friendly. ”       Gary told me, ” I love...
THIS WEEK IN OUR LIBRARY ~ THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN ~ THE CONFLICT

THIS WEEK IN OUR LIBRARY ~ THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN ~ THE CONFLICT

The Battle of Britain conflict took place between July and October of 1940.  It was the first major military campaign in history to be fought entirely in the air. On July 10th, 120 German bombers and fighters struck a British shipping convoy in the English Channel, while 70 more bombers attacked dockyards in South Wales.  Although Britain had fewer fighters than the Germans, it did have an effective radar system, which made the prospects of a sneak attack unlikely.  But in the opening days of the Battle, Britain needed determination and aluminum.  The government asked for all available aluminum. “We will turn your pots and pans into Spitfires and Hurricanes,” the Ministry of Aircraft Production said. THE CONFLICT ITSELF: The Battle of Britain is often described as having four phases, the dates of which seem to vary: Phase One - July 10 - August 12, 1940 - Attacks on Channel Shipping:  On July 16, Hitler issued Directive No. 16, which called for preparations to be made for Operation Sealion - the invasion of Britain.  He demanded that “the British Air Force… be eliminated to such an extent that it will be incapable of putting up any sustained opposition to the invading troops.”  So the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) attacked shipping convoys in the English Channel, Channel ports, and coastal radar stations on the south coast.  By sinking merchant ships, Germany would prevent the British people from receiving the commodities required for their existence.  At the same time, it was hoped that it would draw out the British fighters from their bases so as to analyze the strength of the Royal Air Force,...
Jon’s Pick

Jon’s Pick

This month Jon Ambler has picked a magazine to be the Library pick. Jon called it  “the best overview of D-Day” he has ever read!”  D-Day RAF- The RAF’s Part In The Great Invasion by Clive Rowley, this magazine covers D-Day from the Air. Drop by the library and check it...

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