OUR LIBRARY’S CENTREPIECE ~ THE TABLE!

OUR LIBRARY’S CENTREPIECE ~ THE TABLE!

The Library’s centrepiece is the table you see as you enter the room!  “The table is unique in that it was built for the Museum using beams salvaged from the deconstruction of Hangar #1. Larry Toovey kindly donated his time, tools and skill to construct this table to preserve a piece of 19 Wing’s Heritage. The story behind the beams makes the table even more unique. The beams were some of many hundreds used for the construction of hangars across Canada built in support of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The beams were cut in the early 1940s from old-growth Douglas Fir from British Columbia’s forests. The trees that provided the beams for Hangar #1 were at least 150 years old at the time. The Museum is proud to display such a beautiful and unique piece and is very grateful to Larry for building it for us.” (credit David Stinson and Allison Hetman).   Along the way, it gets some special loving care to keep it in good repair:             The table is a gathering place for Museum meetings, volunteer committee meetings, volunteer special events, school presentations, and tour groups. It is the gathering spot for our air cadet groups.  It is the work table for those of us who volunteer in the Library.  It is the work table for those who come to do some research.  It is indeed a special spot!     In my next post, I’ll introduce you to some of the volunteers who work in the...
WELCOME TO OUR MUSEUM LIBRARY!

WELCOME TO OUR MUSEUM LIBRARY!

Have you had the good fortune to spend time in our Museum Library?  It has quite the history: “The Air Force Indoctrination School (AFIS) opened at CFB Comox in 1982 to give CanadianForces (CF) officers and non-commissioned members serving their first tour on an air base a sound introduction to air force operations, history and heritage. Being a school, particularly in the time before the Internet, a library was a ne- cessity to provide students with appropriate reference material. When AFIS moved to Building 11 in 1986, the Library, still small, was located upstairs in the student lounge. The Comox Air Force Museum (CAFM), founded in 1982 as a small collection of artefacts in Building 22, also moved to Building 11 in 1986, developed greatly and was accredited as a CF Museum in September 1987. In October 1994, CAFM acquired a large collection of over 2500 books, thousands of photographs, hundreds of periodicals, dozens of aircraft models and many military artefacts from the estate of the late Geoffrey Rowe of Victoria. This magnificent gift became known as the Geoffrey Rowe Collection – the donation was recognized by the official naming of the room as the Geoffrey Rowe Memorial Library in June 1995. When AFIS closed in 1996, the library material not transferred to Winnipeg, and all of the Geoffrey Rowe Collection, became part of CAFM. The Library moved to its current location on the north side of the ground floor of Building 11 in October 2003 after the Totem Times, the 19 Wing newspaper, moved elsewhere. The Library is the “information arm” of the Museum. The book collection now...
LEST WE FORGET

LEST WE FORGET

On Friday, our Volunteer Coordinator and Museum Programme Manager, Jon Ambler, travelled to CARIHI Secondary School in Campbell River at the invitation of the staff to speak to the students at their Remembrance Day Assembly.  A former Wing Commander and veteran, Jon reminded them of hard won freedoms, but also of their responsibilities.  He set these within the school’s Remembrance Day theme: Our National Anthem.  I’m sharing a section of his presentation here with you in the hopes that when you next hear and sing our National anthem, you’ll think a little more deeply about our country… that you will not only be reminded of times past, but also of times present… and that as adults, that you might share these thoughts with the young people in your lives…   “… it is my privilege to join you today as we gather, as Canadians, to remember, in this 150th year of our confederation. I appreciate the effort that has gone into creating this remembrance event: you are showing respect, which I, as a veteran, and on behalf of veterans, very much appreciate. I also like the idea of framing our comments with reference to our National Anthem, and for me, and it’s no surprise, the central words are: “Oh Canada, we stand on guard for thee.” But what is Canada? What makes us Canadians? It is not simply a matter of living in the geographic area called Canada, or talking about hockey, or complaining about the weather, or drinking Tim Horton’s. I believe that Canada is an idea, a shared idea, which has become a national identity and a value system. Canadian core...
REMEMBRANCE DAY IN CANADA

REMEMBRANCE DAY IN CANADA

Canada’s first Remembrance Day service was held on November 11th, 1919, at 11 o’clock.  It began as a way to honour those people who had given their lives in World War I, more than 65,000 of them.  A minute of silence across the country marked the end of the war exactly one year before, at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.  Originally called Armistice Day, the name was officially changed to Remembrance Day in 1931. Although people believed that war on such a huge scale could never happen again, WWII broke out in Europe in 1939 and lasted until 1945.  Remembrance Days in Canada added to their honour roll more than one million Canadians who served in WWII.  Some came home safely, but many died at Dieppe and other battlegrounds far from home.  Others were lost in the skies and at sea. At this time, we also honour the nurses who comforted and healed the wounded… the farm, factory, and office workers who did their part in the war effort… the families who scrimped on food and skimped on fuel, and went without luxuries so that soldiers would be better clothed and fed… the wives and mothers who packed parcels for loved ones overseas ( hand-knitted socks, chocolate bars, letters… )… those who opened their doors to the awful news that a brother, a son, or a husband was missing in action, or had been killed… But the Second World War wasn’t the last.  From 1950 to 1953 Canadian Troops fought in the Korean War.  There was the Second Boer War, and then the...
HERITAGE AIR PARK CLOSES FOR THE WINTER SEASON

HERITAGE AIR PARK CLOSES FOR THE WINTER SEASON

Our Heritage Air Park will close for the winter season, effective Wednesday, November 15th.  The Heritage Stones will be covered in their “winter blankets” at this time as well; if you have any questions about the stones, please visit the Museum for help. Also available in the Museum’s Library are two photo albums showing the aircraft and vehicles that belong to our Museum; please come in for a look to learn more about them!...
VETERANS’ WEEK ~ NOVEMBER 5th – 11th, 2017

VETERANS’ WEEK ~ NOVEMBER 5th – 11th, 2017

Each year, in November, many special events take place to commemorate Veterans’ Week (November 5th to 11th) as well as Remembrance Day.  This is a time to honour the courage, sacrifice, and service given by so many Canadians over the years.  Our veterans could be our grandfathers, our fathers, our mothers, our brothers, our sisters, our neighbours… We can remember and honour our Veterans, past and present, by: wearing a poppy, attending local Remembrance Day ceremonies, thanking a veteran by sending a “postcard for peace”, teaching our children about Remembrance Day, reading a “remembrance newspaper” written especially for school children Kindergarten – Grade 7 and up, talking with a relative or friend who serves or served with the Canadian Armed Forces, viewing “Heroes Remember” videos, planting a “Garden of Remembrance”.   Specific information about these activities can be found on the Veterans Affairs website.  In addition, you can buy a poppy in our Gift Shop when you come for a visit, and also, you can go to our Heritage Air Park to see the Heritage Stones that honour loved ones’ service....

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