WHAT LUCIE SAW

WHAT LUCIE SAW

  Lucie volunteers with us on Thursday mornings; we hope you might come in and meet her!  In the meantime, we’re pleased to share two more of Lucie’s drawings with you.                ...
TYKO’S TAKE ~ THE SQUADRONS ON OUR BASE, 19 WING

TYKO’S TAKE ~ THE SQUADRONS ON OUR BASE, 19 WING

  In this, Tyko’s second post, he talks about three squadrons attached to 19 Wing Comox:       19 Air Maintenance Squadron   19 Air Maintenance Squadron (19 AMS) provides second-line aircraft support to all the flying squadrons at CFB Comox, and specific air support to 443 Maritime Helicopter Squadron, Victoria. 19 AMS also provides Explosive ordnance disposal services to 19 Wing and various areas within British Columbia and the Yukon. The commanding officer of 19 AMS is responsible for 110 personnel who work in a wide range of areas including armament, avionics, non-destructive testing aircraft structures and mechanical support. The squadron was formed in 1993. Superbia Et Excellentia (Motto: Pride and Excellence)   407 Long Range Patrol Squadron   No. 407 Coastal Strike Squadron was formed at RAF Thorney Island, England in 1941 first flying the Bristol Blenheim. It was one of seven RCAF squadrons serving with the RAF Coastal Command. From September 1941 to January 1943 the squadron operated as a “strike” squadron attacking enemy shipping with the Lockheed Hudson. It was as a strike squadron that won its reputation and nickname “The Demon Squadron”. On the 29th of January 1943 it was re-designated 407 General Reconnaissance Squadron, and for the remainder of the war the “Demons” protected allied shipping from German U-boats, operating the Vickers Wellington. The squadron was disbanded in 1945 following the end of WWII. In 1952 the squadron was re-activated at RCAF Station Comox as 407 Maritime Reconnaissance Squadron flying the Avro Lancaster. In 1956 it was renamed as a Maritime patrol Squadron. The Squadron has served continually at Comox flying the...
TYKO’S TAKE ~  OUR BASE, 19 WING

TYKO’S TAKE ~ OUR BASE, 19 WING

    Tyko‘s first post introduces us to our base, 19 Wing Comox.         19 Wing Comox, BC The airfield at 19 wing Comox was built as an RAF base in 1942 and in 1943 it was officially designated an RCAF base. Its primary purpose was to fly control for 32 Operational Training Unit (OTU) at Patricia Bay, Victoria. 32 OTU later transferred to Comox and become No. 6 Transport Squadron (RCAF) flying C-47 Dakotas under the command of Group Captain D.C.S Macdonald. In 1946, No.6 Squadron moved to RCAF Station Greenwood N.S. and RCAF Station Comox was closed. In 1952, Comox was re-opened as an Air Defense Command (ADC) establishment under the operational control of 12 Air Defense Group and began an extensive modernization program witch included several new buildings including a new, bigger hangar (hangar 7) and extending the runway to its current 10,000 ft. The stations first operational squadron, 407 “Demons” Maritime Patrol Squadron was reactivated and equipped with Lancaster bombers modified for the Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) role. In 1953, the first 150 permanent personnel quarters were erected and occupied. An elementary school for the RCAF personnel’s children with classrooms for grades one to six and kindergarten was built. 409 “Nighthawks” All Weather Fighter Interceptor Squadron was formed in 1954. Over the years, the squadron was equipped with T-33 Silverstar, CF-100 Canucks and the CF-101 Voodoo. Also formed in 1954 were 51 Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron as part of the CADIN Pinetree radar line. In 1961, Comox was officially placed under the control of Maritime Air Command. Following the closing of RCAF...
THIS MONTH IN OUR LIBRARY ~ VIMY ~ THE INVENTION OF THE TANK

THIS MONTH IN OUR LIBRARY ~ VIMY ~ THE INVENTION OF THE TANK

Military leaders during WW 1 have been labelled as mindless butchers, incapable of original thought, who led soldiers to useless deaths. It is true that the tremendous increases in firing rate and accuracy of both artillery and small arms created extreme lethality, which led to casualties and stalemate, not victory. The truth is actually a little more complex: the crucible of WW 1 was actually a period of great invention and innovation, so much so that it created “A Revolution in Military Affairs”, one that shaped 20th century warfare. No weapons system symbolizes that more than the creation of the tank. Combat in WW1 began in August 1914. Initially consisting of vast armies maneuvering by railway and on foot, the lethality of modern weapons forced the armies to create 450 miles of parallel trenches stretching from the Swiss border to the English Channel. There were no flanks: all attacks had to be head-on. As early as October 1914, after a month of trench warfare, military leaders were already seeking solutions to the stalemate. A LCol Swinton envisaged the need for a machine to cross trenches, barbed wire, and mud to attack the enemy. The basic idea was to take machine guns and heavier guns and place them in a steel box to protect them from defenders’ fire. Powering this machine would be the recently invented (1884) gasoline-fuelled internal combustion engine. An effective continuous track, patented in 1901, would propel them across the shell torn muddy landscape and be able to cross trenches. This unique combination of firepower, protection and mobility was christened the “tank”, a vague term that provided...

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