The Korean Armistice Agreement is the armistice which brought about a complete cessation of hostilities of the Korean War.

 

 

PANMUNJOM, SITE OF THE NEGOTIATIONS

First came the talks… It took some time, not only for the agenda to be decided, but also the talks themselves; there were lengthy gaps between meetings.  The longest started on August 23, 1951, when North Korea claimed the conference site had been bombed; this led to an investigation that eventually determined that evidence appeared to have been manufactured.  Armistice talks began again on October 25, 1951.  Panmunjom was chosen as the new location for negotiations; the responsibility for protection of the village was to be shared by North and South Korea.

One major, problematic negotiation point was the repatriation of the POWs; the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army (PVA), Korean People’s Army (KPA), and the United Nations Command (UNC) couldn’t agree on a system of repatriation.  In the final armistice agreement, a Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission, chaired by Indian General K.S. Thimayya, was set up to handle the matter.

There were also difficulties with fixing the border between North and South Korea; this led to the establishment of the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

 

THE BUILDING WHERE THE KOREAN ARMISTICE AGREEMENT WAS SIGNED, NOW HOUSING THE NORTH KOREA PEACE MUSEUM

 

Finally, on July 19, 1953, delegates reached an agreement that covered all issues on the agenda. And on July 27, 1953, the armistice was signed “… to ensure a complete cessation of hostilities and of all acts of armed force in Korea until a final peaceful settlement is achieved.”  A final peace settlement has yet to be achieved, however.

 

 

 

 

KOREAN WAR ARMISTICE AGREEMENT, 1953

 

The Armistice formally divided the Korean Peninsula, established the DMZ, put into force a cease-fire, and finalized repatriation of prisoners of war.  The DMZ runs close to the 38th parallel and has separated North and South Korea since August 15, 1945