SNOWED IN?  CHECK OUT THESE POPULAR POSTS ON OUR WEBSITE!

SNOWED IN? CHECK OUT THESE POPULAR POSTS ON OUR WEBSITE!

Are you snowed in like we are at the Museum?  Why not have a closer look at some of our most popular posts?  Click on the blue print to link up with the posts themselves.  When you discover one that is especially meaningful to you, comment on it, telling us why you like it!  And while you’re here? Like and share this!  And then ? Sign up to have our posts delivered right to your inbox on the day they’re posted! First up, the first in a new series for us, Introducing Al Wilson, Cartoonist.  He worked at the Totem Times for part of his career, and his cartoons are enjoyed by many of our readers!  We publish two of his cartoons each month.       Next, From Our Main Gallery - Japanese Paper Balloon Bombs.  This was written by one of our volunteers, Gary, who works in the Gift Shop on Tuesday mornings.  Gary loves to be at the Museum and is writing a series of “From Our Main Gallery” pieces for us.  Another popular one he wrote is about medals.  We received some good responses to this one as it helped folks identify some medals they had!  Thanks for all your work, Gary!     Our readers love to learn about what’s going on in the Heritage Air Park and the work our volunteers are doing in Hangar 268, located there.  The progress made on the Dakota Maintenance was a hit!  And Keith did an amazing job organizing the aircraft technical maintenance manuals, work appreciated by base personnel as well.           The...

ESCAPE AND EVASION ~ THREE MORE STORIES OF COURAGE

  WINSTON CHURCHILL ~ During the Boer War, Winston Churchill was a war correspondent; he was captured by the Boers in November of 1899.  He was armed and thus considered a belligerent so was imprisoned with British officers in a converted school in Pretoria.  On December 12, 1899, he vaulted over the wall and made his escape.  He followed the railway, walking at night and sleeping during the day. He made it to the Mozambique border (then a Portuguese colony) and reported to the British Consul in Lourenco Marques.  He then took a boat to Durban in South Africa and joined a South African Military Unit, but did return to England several months later; he eventually ran for Parliament.           FRANZ VON WERRA ~ On September 5th, 1940, Werra’s plane was shot down over Kent.   He crash-landed in a field and captured by an unarmed cook of a nearby army unit.  Initially held in Maidstone’s barracks, he attempted his first escape.  He had been put to work digging and was faced down by Private Denis Rickwood in a small truncheon.  He was interrogated for 18 days and eventually sent to the London District Prisoner of War ‘cage’ and then to POW Camp No. 1. On October 7th, he tried to escape once again, this time during a daytime walk outside the camp.  He slipped over a wall into a field; guards alerted the local farmers and the Home Guard.  On October 10th, two Home Guard soldiers found him sheltering from the rain in a hoggarth, but he quickly escaped and disappeared into the night....
NOW IN OUR LIBRARY ~ ESCAPE AND EVASION ~ THREE STORIES OF COURAGE

NOW IN OUR LIBRARY ~ ESCAPE AND EVASION ~ THREE STORIES OF COURAGE

Most people are aware POWs on both sides will try to escape and return to their own lines. When one is taken prisoner, all you need to give the enemy is your name, rank and serial number.  On both sides interrogators try every trick to learn more and an unfortunate slip can give the enemy a lot of information. A prisoner will try to escape but even if he is not successful, the opposing side must divert many resources in an attempt to recapture the escapee.  One should never cooperate with the enemy unless the end result is to your advantage and not to theirs. During WWI and WWII, when a person escaped in an enemy country, it helped if you could blend in with the local population, speak the language, and dress like the locals.  Having forged papers was an asset as well.  In an occupied country, an escapee could often rely on the local population for food and shelter, and many were soon linked up with an escape route.  Many local people were very short of food but did what they could to help. During those times, the RCAF was not a professional force; most of its people were civilians who enlisted and many men (and women) came from a large cross section of trades and professions.  When these men were put together in a prison camp, their combined skills could produce almost anything. Over the years, people have made good their escape.  I’ve selected a few examples to show you what they achieved.   W/C T.D. CALNAN ~ There is an old saying, “If you do not...

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